Friday, December 13, 2013

'Elementary' GifTweetCap: What Happened to Bell?

Quick note: I know this is way late (the newest episode aired last night), but I couldn't not post it because I already had all the pieces finished. Circumstances just prevented me from posting it until today. The new one will only be about a day late.

Elementary may have changed the game with the episode "Tremors" by disabling a major character. Let's just hope it's not a permanent condition. 

First, we are introduced to a mentally unstable kid with a gun who claims to have killed "the queen," because it was his duty. Sherlock tricks him into letting down his guard by playing into his schizophrenia, and asking him to hand him a meaningful scarf tied to his wrist.
The incident is actually a flashback, including a few flourishes that favor Sherlock's character, added by Sherlock as he sits on the stand and recounts the story in a courtroom. The story is not what the attorney was asking for, but Sherlock insists that it is necessary in order for them to fully understand the situation.
The situation is that the "knight," whose real name is Silas, has created a disturbing painting of himself cutting off the head of the "queen," who is actually a woman by the name of Rada Hollingsworth. Det. Bell finds her address from magazines found in Silas' apartment. When they arrive at her apartment, Hollingsworth is found dead, shot through the heart. Sherlock does not believe that Silas would commit his queen to eternal damnation, which is what he would believe would happen with a shot to the heart.
The purpose of the hearing is to help the judge decide whether Sherlock and Watson will be allowed to continue working with the police department (for free). The problem they have centers around Sherlock's continued breach of protocol, but it is based on a greater wrongdoing that brought their shirking of the rules to the forefront. That wrongdoing somehow ended in the shooting of Det. Bell! 
One example of breach of protocol is illegal breaking and entering, and the temporary theft of property for gathering information. One incident that stands out in this particular case is the theft of a phone to blackmail a man named James Dylan with a parole violation unless he gives them information. Hollingsworth was dying of cancer, and Dylan had bought her life insurance policy in return for monthly payments. He would have made money from her as long as she did not outlive the insurance. Unfortunately, the jerk had an alibi.
That's my phone!
Sherlock lies again on the stand, saying that the information about Dylan was obtained through Internet research. The Internet has everything after all, including "twerking kittens."
Sherlock needed a distraction to help clear his mind so he could refocus on the case. Distractions include weighing his turtle Clyde against various odd items, including the autopsy report.
Sherlock and Watson sorted through some organs to help them deduce what really happened. It turns out that Hollingsworth had been killed by a stage 1 drug for her cancer, which the killer tried to hide with a shot to the heart. Hiding the real cause of death would have allowed the drug to go to the next stage, generating a great deal of profit.
Phineas, the doctor whose drug had killed Hollingsworth, had framed Silas by calling him to the scene and convincing him that he had committed the murder. He put the shells from the gunshots in Silas' pocket, but had not been able to remove blood from his own wound caused by shooting the gun from the grooves. Hence, Phineas was found to be the culprit. 
Sherlock argues that the fact that he saved an innocent man and put away a guilty man during the case should be worth something, even though it resulted in Bell being shot.
Another distraction for Sherlock, to help him take his mind off his own troubles, involves doing one of his favorite things: making Yorkshire pudding. Unfortunately, he hates eating the stuff, so he throws it out. As Sherlock runs around throwing out food, Watson becomes exasperated, calling him a nimrod for forcing her to lie for him. She will have to corroborate all his lies on the stand about not breaking into homes and stealing property. Would Sherlock need so many distractions if he were not feeling guilty about lying? If he does, he won't admit it; he simply welcomes Watson "to the greys."
Later, we see the flashback in which Bell was shot. The shooting was a direct result of having stolen Dylan's phone, and blackmailing him with what was on it. Dylan's coworkers had overheard the exchange, and he lost his job. His boss then notified his parole officer that he had broken parole. So, while Sherlock continues to be snarky when Dylan confronts him, he decides to shoot Sherlock for ruining his life. Bell jumps in front of the bullet, saving Sherlock, but landing himself in the hospital.
Unfortunately, there is a complication with Bell's injury, leading to partial paralysis in his right arm. Watson visits Bell to see how he's doing, but he can barely pick up objects, and he may never be able to work in law enforcement again!
Sherlock once again tries to avoid going to visit Bell in the hospital, again using a distraction to ease his worries. This time, the distraction involves beating his dummy with his stick.
The judge recommends that Sherlock's services be discontinued, but leaves the final decision up to the commissioner. The commissioner then leaves the issue to Bell to decide, and Sherlock and Watson get to stay.
When Sherlock finally visits Bell, he brings along a thank you, an apology, and an offer to pay for all of Bell's physical therapy through a doctor with a high success rate. Bell's emotions are still much too raw to listen to Sherlock or take him up on his offer, however, and he asks that Sherlock not return.

1 comment:

  1. Glad to see others felt Sherlock was both right and a complete douche in this episode. Hard to find a character that is both in equal measure within one episode.

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